Perspectives from Newburgh, Part Two

We asked graduate students from Columbia University‘s architecture and urban design program to reflect on their studio in Newburgh, NY, and what makes work in legacy cities distinct from other American cities. The second winning submission comes to us from Anais Niembro and Nans Voron. Thanks to all the teams who participated!

Working in Newburgh was a challenge for us, as students coming from all other the world. We had to face specific issues deeply rooted in the social struggles of the last 50 years in the United States. We had to quickly analyze and understand this historical context in order to identify triggers and leverage the tools that we had.

Our involvement with the city of Newburgh was also a challenge for the community. Even though many stakeholders were enthusiastic about our collaboration, addressing the local community was difficult. Many were intimidated by our “investigation”, others worried that our work would lead to gentrification and to a loss of social ties amongst the residents.… Read More

Perspectives from Newburgh, Part One

We asked graduate students from Columbia University‘s architecture and urban design program to reflect on their studio in Newburgh, NY, and what makes work in legacy cities distinct from other American cities. The first post comes to us from Katherine Flores. Thanks to all the teams who submitted posts!

Each city or town in New York’s Hudson River Valley has some degree of positive or negative aspects relative to one another. These nuances are what create the tension between defining regional systems and negotiating multiple urban design scales. At the scale of the city, each legacy city can carry its own identity. Newburgh and other cities such as Poughkeepsie or Beacon have similar situations from the stress, or even trauma, of going through urban renewal.

But in the case of Newburgh, when one first researches the city online it is likely you will get a crime alert. If you research Poughkeepsie, that is not the case.… Read More

Let Them In. Bring Them Here.

fleischerBy Peter Fleischer

For our second post in honor of National Welcoming Week, Peter Fleischer joins us from Empire State Future to highlight the various imperatives of immigrant integration in legacy cities.

If it were only a case of 50,000 destitute children interned for trying to enter the United States, we would not still be reading about this ongoing sadness. Many right-minded, good people fear that where there are 50,000 today, there will be 500,000 or perhaps five million refugees before long. So what should one do? I say bring them here. They are kids. They are not a threat, economically or otherwise.

We have room here in the Lake Belt (formerly dubbed the Rust Belt), and soon we will need these brave and oh so familiar strangers, fleeing poverty, hatred and violence, wanting a better life. From Duluth, Minnesota through Milwaukee, Kankakee, Gary, Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, Erie, Buffalo, Syracuse, Albany, all the way to Springfield, Massachusetts and Hartford, Connecticut, our legacy cities have room.… Read More

Upstate “Legacy Cities” Gain the Most from Regional Approaches to Economic Development

Download and share the report (complete press release here) that calls upon elected, business, and civic leaders to double down on innovative and regionally focused approaches to economic development for Upstate NY’s “Legacy Cities”—a term being adopted by a growing number of those working to improve America’s older industrial cities that have experienced significant population loss.

The report summarizes input from over one hundred public, private, and non-profit sector leaders recently assembled from across New York State to prioritize economic development strategies. Lieutenant Governor Duffy, charged the policy workshop participants to identify key Upstate Legacy City revitalization priorities for practitioners and policy makers. Moreover, the recommendations provide critical tools to encourage and inform a growing national dialogue on the future of Legacy Cities and their critical role in 21st century economic prosperity and quality of life.… Read More