Baltimore: From Consultation to Collaboration

anthonyscottheadshotBy Anthony Scott

Over the past eight months, I participated in the Opportunity Collaborative Fellows Program, which brought together 33 local leaders to respond to a plan developed for the Baltimore metropolitan region. The collaboration was initiated in order to 1) ensure the plan reflected the needs of the region, and 2) foster local leaders’ ability to think regionally to solve the region’s disparities.

The Baltimore Metropolitan Council (BMC), and the Opportunity Collaborative (the Collaborative)— a consortium of local governments, Maryland state agencies, universities and nonprofit organizations—worked for three years to develop the Regional Plan for Sustainable Development (RPSD) for the Baltimore metropolitan region. The RPSD provides a way forward for Baltimore City and surrounding counties to coordinate investments in housing, transportation and workforce development, and to reduce disparities recently highlighted by police violence and the resulting unrest amongst residents. The Collaborative, funded by a Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant from the U.S.… Read More

Media Round-Up!

This week in legacy cities news:

The Persistence of Failed History: “White Infill” as the New “White Flight”?
by Richey Piiparinen at Urbanophile
Piiparinen explores the “back-to-the-city” movement, an inversion of 1968’s flight to the suburbs, challenging the little proven trickle-down effect of “white infill” in the inner city.

Can Youngstown Make It On Its Own?
by Alan Mallach at Rooflines
“The entire region [has] to realize not only that Youngstown isn’t going away, but that their decline and that of the city are totally intertwined—and that the region isn’t going to revive until or unless Youngstown does.”

When Will We Hear About the Actual People in Detroit?
by Bill Bradley at Next City
Bill Bradley wonders when public officials will talk about the real problems in Detroit: poverty, crime and social inequity.

How to Make Detroit’s Data Accessible
By Nancy Scola at Next City
Also at Next City, an interview with nonprofit Data Driven Detroit director Erica Raleigh.… Read More

Can We Demolish Our Way to Revitalization?

alanmallachBy Alan Mallach

While the answer to that question in the title of this piece is obvious, there’s a strong case to be made that a lot of the buildings that make up America’s older cities may have to go, if these cities are to find a path to a new, better future. That was brought home recently by a NY Times article with the misleading title of “Blighted Cities Prefer Razing to Rebuilding.”

The title is misleading, because I know a lot of people in these cities, and I can’t think of a single one who actually prefers razing to rebuilding. At the same time, the article made an important point: for cities like Detroit, Cleveland or Baltimore, demolition has started to become a strategy, not an intermittent response to the individual problem building. This is a tough conclusion to reach, especially for those of us who love old buildings and admire the individual efforts that have saved many of them over the years, but an inevitable one.… Read More

Intercity High-Speed Rail and Urban Suburbs

samhershBy Sam Hersh

I am certainly not the first to point out the ability of a high-speed-rail line to bring small cities into the metropolitan area as “semi-urban suburbs.” In fact, the idea is trumpeted about so often, (especially in England where high-speed rail emanating from the south has extended the London megalopolis ever northward) that I fear we in America have started to see high-speed rail as a silver bullet for many struggling legacy cities.

Instead, we should look to such high-speed rail suburbs as a possible asset for metropolitan areas in need. We should not aim to pour the money necessary for a high-speed rail line into any city that seems close enough to benefit. To justify the cost of building a high-speed rail line to a legacy city with the hope of creating an urban suburb, two questions must be asked that challenge the usefulness of the line, not just to the development of the legacy city but to the metropolitan region.… Read More