Community Gardens as Arenas of Change


marouhMarouh Hussein writes on the transformative effect of community gardens in distressed neighborhoods and offers insight as to what legacy cities might learn from Harlem’s community garden movement.

Community gardens are not a new phenomenon but they have received increased attention in recent years because of their proven benefits. Whether they are spaces of food production, leisure, or recreation, the presence of a community garden in a distressed neighborhood often catalyzes change beyond these usages. The community garden movement in the mid-1970s and 1980s in Harlem, a neighborhood in New York City that, like legacy cities, experienced dramatic population decline, was a powerful tool that residents used to reclaim their neighborhood.

The first community gardens were used as a defense against the dilapidation and poverty that were plaguing Harlem in the 1970s. They were a means for residents to turn vacant lots that had become playgrounds for drug dealers, prostitution, gangs and rodents into spaces for the community to gather.… Read More

From Kiev to Cleveland: Immigrants & Industry in Legacy Cities


annetrubekAnne Trubek is the founding Editor-In-Chief of Belt magazine and publisher of Rust Belt Chic Press. She has published articles in The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Wired, and has appeared on NPR’s Weekend Edition, The Diane Rehm Show, and Talk of the Nation. She is currently writing The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting (Bloomsbury USA, Fall 2014).

This article originally appeared in Belt magazine and is reposted with permission from the author and publication.

Say Cleveland manufacturing and many think steel. But there was a large, influential, and vibrant garment industry in the city, too. By the middle of the 20th century, a good percentage of the clothes that Americans wore were produced in Cleveland. At one point, one in seven Clevelanders worked in the garment industry, the city employed thousands of seamstresses and pressers, was second to New York in size and the source of much America’s ready-to-wear clothing.… Read More

Rust Belt Living: A Transplant’s Perspective


Amy Hanauer, founding executive director of Policy Matters Ohio, writes in Belt Magazine about what it was like to move to Cleveland in 1998:

Six-month-old in tow, we flew here for a weekend, hooked up with a real-estate agent by a soon-to-be Kent State colleague. “I think Cleveland Heights or Shaker Heights seems like the right fit for us,” I told her assuredly, but she insisted on dragging us through Cuyahoga Falls and Hudson, her out-of-work executive husband unhelpfully along for the ride. “Hudson,” he drawled, in his Texas accent, “is a regular U-NI-ted Nations.”

Adjusting to the changing tides of the city:

We didn’t know then that the roomy bookstore would close a few years later, along with countless other bookstores in America [. . .]. We didn’t yet know that one failed school levy too many would eventually push us, then with two kids, three miles south to Shaker, another well-integrated suburb but one that more consistently funds its schools.

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