Media Round-Up!

It’s time for another media round-up!  And here we go…!

Take it to the Bank: How Land Banks Are Strengthening America’s Neighborhoods by the Center for Community Progress

An estimated 120 land banks exist in theUnited States, and their ability to adapt to local conditions and needs is helping communities, large and small, address the negative impacts of vacant, abandoned, and tax-delinquent properties.

In Take it to the Bank: How Land Banks Are Strengthening America’s Neighborhoods, authors Payton Heins and Tarik Abdelazim, from the Center for Community Progress, reveal trends in the growing land bank movement.   Examining more than half of the nation’s land banks, the report includes (1) characteristics of successful land banks, (2) a national scan of land banking in the U.S., (3) in-depth portraits of seven diverse land banks, and (4) a rich array of appendices featuring land bank policies and other core documents.

 

Immigrant Talent Study Helps Six Cities Leverage Local Talent to Contribute to Economic Development by the Knight Foundation

A new study of college-educated immigrants will track the experiences of underutilized, skilled immigrants in six cities to discover ways to better integrate and leverage the talents of workers who were educated abroad. The study is being led by the nonprofit World Education Services with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

The study will survey immigrants in four cities where Knight invests through its community and national initiatives program: Detroit, Miami, Philadelphia and San Jose.   Boston and Seattle will also be included in the survey because of their large population of college-educated immigrants, and their potential to uncover valuable lessons for other cities.

Minneapolis Has a Plan for the Most Resilient Neighborhood in the Country by Rachel Dovey, Next City

For a Legacy City like Minneapolis, climate change will most likely lead to wetter, hotter years by mid-century, with annual temperatures rising as much as 5 degrees. Unfortunately, like most cities, its pipes, sewers and even electricity were laid for very different weather. Adapting could require the ability to disconnect from that grid — which is exactly what the planners of one futuristic neighborhood propose to do.

 

The City of Philadelphia Wants You to Stop Ignoring Icky Overflowing Sewers by Sarah Goodyear, Next City

The Venice Island facility is the latest and most visible manifestation of Philly’s Green City, Clean Waters program, a 25-year, $2.5 billion initiative spearheaded by the Philadelphia Water Department that is changing the way the city manages its stormwater.  Crucially, it is a program that involves both private and public stakeholders.

 

“We are and always will be a nation of immigrants” by Welcoming America

 

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